2013 Pre-Conference Workshops


Pre-Conference Workshop #1
Tuesday, October 1 and Wednesday, October 2, 2013
8:15 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

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Advanced EEG and MEG Data Analysis: Cortical Source Imaging Using Brainstorm and SPM8; A Hands-On Training.

Stephan Moratti, Ph.D.
University of Madrid
Sylvain Baillet, Ph.D.
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University
Francois Tadel, Ph.D.
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University

The aim of this two-day workshop is to train psychophysiologists/neuroscientists using advanced EEG and MEG data analysis methods such as cortical source estimation, spectral decomposition, functional connectivity analysis and general linear models for statistical inference in sensor and source space. Thereby the importance of graphical representation of the results for publication purposes is highlighted as well.

The first day of the workshop Sylvain Baillet and Francois Tadel will introduce the open source Matlab toolbox Brainstorm (http://neuroimage.usc.edu/brainstorm/). Hereby, source imaging, spectral decomposition and functional connectivity measures will be emphasized. The second day Stephan Moratti will give an introduction to SPM8 (www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/software/spm8/) whereby source imaging and statistical parametric mapping for EEG/ MEG data using the general linear model machinery of SPM8 will be highlighted.

The workshop will provide direct hands-on training for these two toolboxes in order to enable the trainee to combine the strengths of Brainstorm and SPM8. The attendee should previously install the two toolboxes on their laptop (see links above for installing instructions) and download the example data. (Additional link(s) will be forthcoming to workshop attendees).

NOTE: Attendees will need to bring their own adaptors for power supply.



Pre-Conference Workshop #2
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

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Using Electrical Stimulation, EMG, GSR, Heart-Rate and Pupil Dilation in Combination with BOLD-MRI: Challenges and Opportunities.

H. Steven Scholte, Ph.D.
University of Amsterdam
Sonja Van Well, Ph.D.
University of Amsterdam
Renée M. Visser, M.Sc.
University of Amsterdam

Technical and methodological developments in the last decade have made it relatively easy to record additional physiological measures in a MRI surrounding. This has opened new avenues for concurrently measuring different, often dissociated, response systems which is relevant for fields such as emotion research. This one-day workshop will focus on how to use electrical stimulation, acoustic startle reflex, heart-rate variability, galvanic skin response (GSR)and pupil dilation in BOLD-MRI experiments.

  • The workshop will start with an overview of the hardware and the sampling strategies necessary for the successful recording and analysis of physiological measures in general.
  • Next we will deal with recording EMG to measure the acoustic startle reflex and concurrent pupil dilation responses in a fear conditioning paradigm, giving a step by step detailed overview of how to correct for artifacts in these data. We will also discuss how BOLD-MRI augments the results obtained by the physiological measures.
  • After this we will deal with recording GSR and pupil dilation responses in a fear conditioning paradigm and give a step-by-step detailed overview of how to correct for artifacts in these data. We will also discuss how BOLD-MRI augments the results obtained by the physiological measures, thereby specifically focusing on single-trial data analysis as a way to monitor the development of associative fear over time.
  • The workshop will end with a floor discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the different physiological measures in relationship to their ease of implementation in an MRI environment.



Pre-Conference Workshop #3
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

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NIH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC)

Bruce Cuthbert, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health
Charles Sanislow, Ph.D.
Wesleyan University
Peter Lang, Ph.D.
University of Florida
Judy Ford, Ph.D.
University of California San Francisco
Chris Patrick, Ph.D.
Florida State University
Alfons Hamm, Ph.D., Jan Richter, Ph.D.
University of Greifswald

The Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC) is a new initiative developed by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to "Develop, for research purposes, new ways of classifying mental disorders based on dimensions of observable behavior and neurobiological measures." This project has attracted considerable attention both in the U. S. and internationally as an innovative new approach for studying and classifying psychopathology. RDoC may be viewed as an inherently psychophysiological enterprise, in that it integrates psychological and physiological measurements to explore functional dimensions that range from normal to abnormal extremes.

The aim of this workshop is to provide an in-depth consideration of the project, and of ways that the RDoC framework can be employed to facilitate psychophysiological research on mental disorders. Discussions and questions will be encouraged throughout the workshop in order to develop a full understanding of the RDoC initiative and its directions.

  • The workshop will begin with a presentation of the rationale, background, and organization of the RDoC initiative and its research matrix.
  • The second section of the workshop will include a discussion of the various ways that RDoC research studies can be designed, highlighting differences with traditional ways of studying mental disorders.
  • The afternoon session will include discussions with four SPR presidents whose research programs have contributed significantly to the development of RDoC, and represent outstanding exemplars of work consistent with the RDoC framework.